What's Up at the Library?

 
How will you put some spark in your summer? Create your summer at the library with unique reading programs and challenges for every age. Meet and be inspired by the library's artist-in-residence, award-winning author and illustrator Chris Raschka, and see his artwork on display in the Marketplace, June 4 through August 12. Explore fun, engaging, interactive programs to fuel your creativity, all summer long. Watch your mailbox for the library's summer newsletter for more information. Registration for all summer reading programs begins June 4.


 
More than 800 people including parents, students, teachers and community members stopped by the library's Marketplace on Thursday, May 3 to celebrate the opening of the 26th Annual District 25 Student Art Show.
 
The opening night reception featured a performance from the South Middle School Jazz Ensemble, a reading of Charlie Parker Played Be Bop by Chris Raschka, a short film screening from the fifth grade students of Dryden Elementary School and plenty of refreshments.
 
This year's show currently features the artwork of nearly 400 students from seven elementary schools and two middle schools that can be seen in the Marketplace, the Dunton display cases and the Kids' World display cases.
 
These pieces range from 2D illustrations to 3D sculptures and will be on display in the library from now through Sunday, May 27.
 


 
"Making a World of Difference" was the theme of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Annual Volunteer Recognition Luncheon, which honored the library's 426 volunteers who contributed 28,413 hours of service in 2017.
 
"We've been able to maintain our imagination and stretch our excellence," said library board president Debbie Smart to a large gathering of volunteers on Tuesday, May 8. "We're bigger and better than ever and that's because of you."
 
The afternoon served as a reminder of the world of difference that each volunteer has made at the library.
 
"Volunteers are not in this for the recognition," said library Volunteer Coordinator Kelley McCoy. "They just do it because it's in their hearts."
 
Funded by the Friends of the Library, this year's gathering honored those who volunteer in all areas of the library including the English as a Second Language (ESL) office, Kids' World, genealogy, the Senior Center, the Friends of the Library and the bookmobile.
 
Thirty-one volunteers received special recognition for achieving Hours of Service milestones from 500 hours to 16,500 hours. Years of service were also recognized and spanned from three years to 35 years of service.
 
The top honor of the day went to Al Hong, who was named Volunteer of the Year. This one-time award is given to the volunteer who has contributed the greatest number of hours during the previous year but has not previously received the award. He earned Volunteer of the Year for contributing 322 hours of service in 2017 by working in the library's ESL office.

"[Volunteering] lets me have a chance to encourage younger people and newer immigrants in our community," he said. He began volunteering at the library in 2016 and hopes that by displaying the importance of volunteering, his younger acquaintances and family members will follow his lead and volunteer as well.
 
Those who have worked with him spoke positively about his time at the library.
 
"I had the pleasure of meeting Al Hong at one of our volunteer meetings this spring," said ESL Coordinator Tracy Karim. "Hearing him speak about his experience with tutoring our ESL students, and his obvious passion for helping them not only to improve their English language abilities, but also with so many facets of life, literally brought tears to my eyes. He so deserves this award."


 
Close to 100 Arlington Heights residents and students from the High School District 214 Newcomer Center experienced the art of community service on Monday, January 15 by working together at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library to create a large three-panel mural honoring the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Under the guidance of renowned local artist Gino Savarino, participants of all ages gathered in the library’s Cardinal Room to paint during one of the three 90-minute sessions.
 
“It’s like a giant coloring book, just paint and stay in the lines,” said Savarino as he welcomed participants. “I’ll be there to guide you every step of the way.”
 
Throughout the day, participants took turns applying bright swaths of color and painted side-by-side, filling in the canvases that were designed by Savarino to convey a pop art feel and include images that reflect Dr. King’s legacy and symbols of Arlington Heights. 
 
“The goal was to provide an opportunity for the community to come together to honor Dr. King’s legacy and to work together to create something that will be a lasting legacy,” said Angela Jones, the library’s Community Engagement Liaison.
 
Among the participants were 25 students from the Newcomer Center, District 214’s facility that prepares students who are new to the United States to successfully transition to their home high schools. The students, both current and former, represented five countries.
 
“What are your dreams for the future?” asked Newcomer Center Coordinator Mario Perez to the students and residents who gathered. Perez, one of the event organizers, encouraged students and residents to share personal experiences and family stories of immigration in small group discussions between painting sessions.
 
“Being able to participate in something where you are part of the whole is so important,” said Arlington Heights resident Julie Kurka, who brought her 11-year-old sixth-grader to the library to paint on her day off of school. “Rather than just doing for yourself, it’s nice to do more and give back.”
 
The completed mural was on display in the library during February and will eventually be permanently hung at the Newcomer Center, which is housed at the Forest View Educational Center in Arlington Heights. The event organizers plan to bring the mural to local schools and other community locations in the coming months. Watch the video below to see the mural coming together. 
 
 


 
The bookmobile will be unavailable on Tuesday, May 22 due to repairs. All fines for any bookmobile item due on May 22 will be waived and all holds will be held until the next time the bookmobile is in your area.


 
A forum for anyone interested in exploring the idea of starting or purchasing a business or investing in a franchise opportunity. This will be a safe place to ask questions and get answers from entrepreneurs and business experts who have agreed to share their knowledge and experience in an interactive discussion format. Featuring Howard B. Schwedel and Michael Liss.
 
Date and time: Thursday, May 24, 6:30–8 p.m.
Location: Business Center


Adults, business
 
In a job search, it’s not what you know that matters, but who knows you. Find out how networking, building relationships, and becoming a “known candidate” can lead to your next career.
 
Date and time: Thursday, May 24, 7–8:30 p.m.
Location: Cardinal Room
Register


Adults, Reference
 
Lakeside Pride Jazz Orchestra kicks off Bravo! Create Your Summer with a performance for cool cats of all ages. Don't miss this interactive musical extravaganza that everyone can enjoy, featuring big band hits and jazz favorites inspired by artist and illustrator Chris Raschka, the library's summer artist-in-residence. This performance will include a live reading of Raschka's book, Charlie Parker Played Be Bop. Register yourself or a group of up to four.
 
The Lakeside Pride Jazz Orchestra is a 20-piece jazz band that offers thrilling and engaging performances spanning the full spectrum of the jazz repertoire. This group of advanced players has been honored to perform at many large-scale events throughout Chicago, including appearances headlining the Chicago History Museum's Last Speakeasy Annual Gala and the Adler Planetarium's Adler After Dark series. The jazz band is a part of the Lakeside Pride Music Ensemble, which is a nonprofit organization that provides a welcoming environment of inclusion and diversity for LGBT and allied musicians to find community.
 
Date and time: Tuesday, June 5, 7-8:30 p.m.
Location: Metropolis Performing Arts Centre, 111 W. Campbell St.


Adults, Family
 
The library’s new subscription to PressReader offers access to thousands of newspapers and magazines from around the world and in dozens of languages – from daily issues of The Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times to India’s Hindustan Times and Magazine Futbol Tactico from Argentina. To learn more visit PressReader here


 
“My cerebral palsy affects my speech and mobility but not my spirit.” In 12 short words, Arlington Heights resident Esther Lee gives voice to her life’s work: disability law attorney, president of Able Community—a nonprofit housing improving independence for people with disabilities, and writer and creator of poetry with a purpose.

“Common themes of my poetry are home, or longing for home, and belonging, or in most cases not belonging,” Lee shared in an email.

 
It was a love for writing poetry that led her to explore Writer’s Ink, the library’s monthly meeting for local writers. Lee, who graduated from Thomas Middle School, holds a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California Davis, School of Law, focusing on civil rights and public interest law. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, having graduated with honors and an emphasis on creative writing.
 
“I was used to workshopping my poetry with classmates as a rhetoric major in college, but I wasn’t sure what to expect from this group at a public library,” Lee shared. “I was apprehensive (at first), especially being one of the youngest writers there and a poet in a room full of fiction writers. Fortunately, everyone has always been welcoming.” 
 
Lee has been participating in Writer’s Ink for about a year. At a Wednesday evening meet-up, she and seven other aspiring writers gathered with writing coach and facilitator Jacob Knabb around a conference room table to share their latest work. Earlier in the day, Lee had emailed Knabb her poem, “There’s An Elephant Living Upstairs,” so that he could read it aloud to the group for critique. She listened attentively and through a computer-activated voice assistance device asked the group if they thought the ending was ‘too easy or too in your face?’
 
I like the abruptness of it, “Knabb assured her. “It’s lovely broken into verse, quite perfect in that shape.”

“Jacob always strives to give us feedback to improve our writing,” Esther shared following the meeting. “I haven’t worked with many fiction writers, so I am learning more about narrative and memoirs, as there are a lot of memoirists in the group.”

 
“Esther makes them feel a comradery, there’s a certain comfort there,” Knabb added while reflecting on the dynamics of the group. “Her poetry is honest and real and explores topics that allow others in the group to open up.”
 
Find an upcoming Writer's Ink meeting to join on our calendar
 


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy