What's Up at the Library?


In the past year the library has presented storytimes, STEM clubs, book discussions, author visits, exhibits, summer reading programs and more. We've welcomed the community to celebrate the arts at the District 25 art show and reception, a fairy tale exhibit and costume gala and months of themed programs exploring fairy tales. Arlington Heights came together to read and discuss the themes behind the One Book, One Village book selection and tweens and teens found opportunities to learn and discover together. Local entrepreneurs gathered to share their experiences with small business owners and the library continued to offer new tools for customers to get creative in the Studio.

The library is a busy place thanks to our customers, with nearly 90,000 people attending programs at the library in 2015. Check out our video featuring highlights of the past year, then see a list of upcoming programs at ahml.info.



 
Launchpads Take Off in Kids’ World
 
New Launchpad learning tablets are now available for check-out in Kids’ World. Each tablet is pre-loaded with learning games for children. Search “launchpad” at ahml.info to see available tablets and games or look for them in the STEM area in Kids’ World.


 
Do you have old home movies, photos or slides you need digitized? Wish you could record an oral history with a loved one who cannot get to the library’s recording studio? Need better tools to take professional photos of products for your business? With new equipment available from the library’s Studio, you can get creative with video, music, graphic design, digitization, photography and more.
 
New Features:
• Adobe’s Creative Cloud, featuring Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign
• RetroScan, a tool for digitizing 8mm, Super 8mm and 16mm film
• ProTools software for composing, recording, editing and mixing music and soundtracks
• Lighting Cube for product photography
• Recording Kits- bring the Studio home with you
• Wacom Tablet for check-out
• Zoom H4N Handheld Stereo Recorder with Built-in Microphones for check-out
 
Other Studio Equipment:
• Tools for digitizing VHS, cassettes, vinyl, photos, slides and more
• Logic Pro X and Garageband
• iMovie and Final Cut X
• Soundproof booth, electric drum kit and keyboards for recording
• Lighting, backdrops and cameras for video and photography
• GoPro cameras for check-out
 

The Studio is located on the first floor. Schedule a one-on-one appointment to use the Studio or attend an upcoming tech class. Call 847-392-0100 to make a reservation or book online at ahml.info/studio. View tech classes at ahml.info/techclasses. Learn more about the Studio at ahml.info/studio. The Studio is funded by the Friends of the Library.

 


 
"Fairy tales were and still are comfort reading to me," said Gregory Maguire, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West during a special library-sponsored appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Wednesday evening, March 9. 
 
More than 200 people turned out to hear Maguire deliver a lively 75-minute exploration of creativity and storytelling titled, "No Rest for the Wicked: On Reading and Writing Fantasy....and the Magic of Broadway." 
 
"Life itself is the most wonderful of fairy tales," began Maguire by quoting one of his favorite fairy tale authors, Hans Christian Andersen. From there Maguire candidly shared his story of a tough childhood in Albany, New York, "All the fairy tales I came across as a child seemed to be secret biographies of me." With equal parts wit and wisdom, Maguire took the audience on an intimate journey by projecting family photographs and images of his earliest stories already filled with adventure and fantasy. "I wrote more than 100 stories between fourth and tenth grade. I'd finish one and say that was fun, let's do it again."
 
That same enthusiasm continues today. Maguire has published 38 books including his latest novel, After Alice, a new twist on the Lewis Carroll classic Alice in Wonderland.
 
Since its publication in 1995, Wicked has sold five million copies and became the basis for the smash hit Tony-award winning Broadway musical. Maguire showed the audience the original draft of the award-winning novel, a handwritten manuscript. "Look, it's pen, paper, I'm using notebooks. I'm still writing much like I did in fourth grade."
 
Following his animated presentation, Maguire took questions from the audience and shared insights on his writing process.
 
"All of my stories begin with a moral or intellectual question like what is evil and where does it come from or what is beauty," said Maguire.
 
The evening ended with a book signing and meet and greet with the author in the lobby of the Metropolis.


Adults

What better way to learn about writing, theater and the creative process than to meet a bestselling author. That's what happened for close to 200 District 214 students who had the opportunity to meet Gregory Maguire, creator of Wicked:The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, on Wednesday, March 9 during the author's library-sponsored visit to Arlington Heights. 
 
Maguire spoke with students, many from the theater, English and creative writing classes, at Rolling Meadows High School and shared with them his experiences as a young boy who spent a lot of time at his local library to his unexpected rise to fame with the publication of Wicked. Maguire spoke candidly for about 45 minutes and then answered questions from the students during a lively Q&A.
 
Rolling Meadows High School was the first stop on the author's day-long appearance which was in celebration of Once Upon a Time...Exploring the World of Fairy Tales, a play exhibit currently underway at the library. Maguire will speak to an audience at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre beginning at 7 p.m.

 



 
The library continued its celebration of all things fairy tale by welcoming tween fairy tale author Liesl Shurtliff to the library on February 25. Shurtliff, the author of Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin and Jack: The True Story of Jack and the Beanstalk, talked with a group of more than 150 fairy tale fans about myths and legends, where they come from, how they change and what they mean to us today. More than 40 tweens joined Shurtliff for a writing workshop earlier in the day for fourth- to sixth-grade students.
 
Please join us for an upcoming fairy-tale themed program or visit Kids’ World's Once Upon a Time…Exploring the World of Fairy Tales interactive play exhibit for children ages 3 to 10 that runs through March 26. The exhibit is made possible by a gift from the Friends of the Library. To learn more about the Once Upon a Time exhibit and fairy tale programs for all ages, including family movie screenings nights, puppet shows and plays, book discussions, crafts and more, visit ahml.info/fairytales.



Following a six-month pilot period in 2016, the Arlington Heights Memorial Library Board of Trustees voted to extend the library’s weekend hours, remaining open until 8 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, and opening the library an hour earlier, at 11 a.m., on Sundays. The cost for the library’s extended hours was managed within the library’s approved budget.
 
The library’s new hours are:
Monday–Friday  9 a.m.–10 p.m.
Saturday  9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Sunday  11 a.m.–8 p.m.
 
The pilot program was based upon a survey of library customers which indicated many residents wished the library offered more hours on the weekends. An extensive study of customer use during the pilot program confirmed these survey results. For example, use of the Studio saw a 67 percent increase in weekend reservations. On average, 165 customers visited the library per hour during the pilot program, using the library during hours the library previously would have not been open.
 
"These expanded hours stem from the fact that people's lives are busier than ever, and we want to make it as convenient as possible for them to visit the library," said Executive Director Jason Kuhl. “We saw strong use of the library in all areas and are happy to continue this customer service going forward.”
 


 
The library celebrated all things Harry Potter on Thursday, February 4, with an evening of fun fit for a wizard. Wearing costumes and signature Harry styles, participants soaked in the magic and rolled up their sleeves for Hogwarts-themed activities in the Marketplace and The Hub: Harry Potter Bingo, O.W.L. Trivia, Jumping Frog Origami, a Design a Patronus activity and a costume drawing. Participants visited the Sorting Hat to show their House Pride and stopped by Ollivanders to pick out a wand and the latest edition of the Quibbler. Wizards and Muggles alike enjoyed Harry Potter-inspired treats.

The library's annual Harry Potter Book Night, now in its second year, honors J.K. Rowling’s unforgettable stories and the magic of Harry Potter.



Adults, Family
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups, 558 books were donated for children and teens for Wheeling Township’s Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Chamber of Commerce Professional Women’s Council. Teen books were identified as a particular need this year, and Arlington Heights answered our call for materials needed for a broader age of readers, with many titles donated for teens and tweens. Since starting the holiday book drive in 1998, the library has donated 15,031 books to children in need. Thank you for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays!


 
"I think I'm still a short storyteller at heart," author Cristina Henríquez told an audience of 200+ during an appearance at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre on Thursday evening, November 12. Cristina spoke about her novel, The Book of Unknown Americans, which was chosen as the 2015 One Book, One Village selection by the library. In an interview-style program moderated by Info Services Librarian Mike Monahan, Cristina spoke candidly about her book which she originally wrote as a short story before expanding - a task which took five years to complete and tells the story of two families who have immigrated to the United States from Latin America and their neighbors living in a Delaware apartment complex.
 
"The second you hear someone's story, or imagine their story, it becomes so much harder to be intolerant," she said. "One of the goals of the book was to keep poking at stereotypes."
 
Following the 50-minute conversation on-stage, the author fielded questions from the audience which included sharing insights on the editing and publishing process.

Earlier in the program when asked to describe the meaning of home, Henríquez responded, "Home is not a place. To me, home is a feeling. It's that feeling when your soul sighs."

The Metropolis event capped off a day-long exchange between the author and the Arlington Heights community about The Book Unknown Americans. Earlier at the library, she did a short reading from the novel for an audience in the Cardinal Room and met in the Hub with more than 80 students from three District 214 schools.

 


 
District 214 students meet One Book, One Village author in the Hub
 
What better way to learn about a book than to meet its author. That's what happened for more than 80 high school students who had the opportunity to meet Cristina Henríquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans, during her November 12 visit to Arlington Heights and the library for One Book, One Village. 
 
The students gathered in the Hub from three schools - John Hersey High School, Rolling Meadows High School and District 214's Newcomer Center - and spent more than an hour with Cristina asking questions about the book, its characters and what it takes to be an author.
 
"It took me five years to write this book and there were days when it really was a struggle and I wondered if I'd ever finish it," she told the students. Henríquez later added, "The best thing you can do for your writing is to forget that anyone is ever going to read it and just write."
 
 
 


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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy