Posts tagged with "cooking"

Posted by dnapravn on 04/10/14
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Every once in a while I get ambitious about cooking, much to my family's delight (or dismay...I'm not 100% sure). So when I discovered 200 Skills Every Cook Must Have: The Step by Step Methods that Will Turn a Good Cook into a Great Cook by Clara Paul and Eric Treuille, I was intrigued. How many of those skills did I already possess and what new skills could I learn?
 
200 Skills Every Cook Must Have is an illustrated guide laid out in a simple step-by-step format. The book concentrates on skills rather than recipes, although it does contain its fair share of basic recipes for sauces and such. Organized by topic, it covers a wide range of cooking skills from very basic skills such as separating eggs and peeling and dicing, to more challenging skills like steaming lobster and making soufflés.
 
The book contained many skills I already knew how to do (thank goodness!), as well as things I know I will never need to do, such as spatchcocking a chicken, which is to remove the back and breast bone so the chicken can be laid out flat. Seriously? More importantly though, it was filled with tips and tricks I'd like to try, as well as things I've done once or twice but am certainly no expert at, such as making gravy or hollandaise sauce.
 
All in all, I found that this book has something for everyone and proves to be a great guide for all skill levels. Bon appétit!

Posted by mingh on 05/18/11
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Gabrielle Hamilton is the head chef and owner of the popular New York restaurant Prune. The subtitle of this book is "the inadvertent education of a reluctant chef." Hamilton learned much of her cooking from observing her Mother and Father. Her Mother, a French ballet dancer, had to use all parts of whatever she was cooking to make everything last. Hamilton's Father was an artist and sometime theater producer. But the family of five children never had a lot of money. They tried to live off the land as much as possible and her Father even taught Hamilton how to kill a chicken.
 
You can read a lot of love and admiration in her stories of her parents when she was young. When Hamilton was 13, her parents divorced and everything seemed to fall apart in her life. So much so, that her parents forgot who was watching the youngest children and left them on their own for four weeks at their rural house. The children had been taught a lot of self-sufficiency. It even gave Hamilton enough confidence to walk to town and present herself as a 16 year old waitress for a local restaurant. This sets up a pattern for her life as she confidently starts to reinvent herself as older and more experienced at many different jobs--almost always in the food industry. The catering chapters alone will make you re-think any catering you are needing or wanting.
 
This is a memoir more than a foodie book. There are some deeper issues in this book that Hamilton presents than just becoming a chef. There is some bitterness, arguably understandable, considering she was basically abandoned by her family at 13 years old. As she grows older, Hamilton makes some interesting choices in her life, she tries to reconnect with her family, and finds in her travels to Italy that food is what can bring people together.

Posted by Katie M on 01/16/18
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Bon Appétempt: A Coming-Of-Age Story (with Recipes!) by Amelia Morris, a 30-something “food” blogger, who writes a popular blog by the same title, is full of funny and charming stories in Morris’ distinctive voice. On her popular blog, PBS has produced her videos, she has won a Saveur food blog award, and her blog has been previously recognized as one of TIMES’s 25 Best Blogs of the Year.

Sharing personal observations about her life and family, she reveals relatable family dramas and growing into who you want to be. Full of thoughtful anecdotes, and a variety of recipes, from her mom’s comfort snack of Toasted Cheerios, to a delicious recipe for lemon pasta from her husband, this is a self-aware coming-of-age memoir. I recommend this book to anyone familiar with her Bon Appétempt blog or who likes modern memoirs.

Posted by Ultra Violet on 01/19/11
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You may know Chris Kimball as the host of America's Test Kitchen on PBS. This book is a very entertaining account of Kimball's journey through the Fannie Farmer cookbook to stage an authentic twelve-course 19th century supper for twelve in his Victorian brownstone. Kimball's anecdotes about his rather sketchy Boston neighborhood were interesting. But of course, the trials and tribulations he and his staff faced in recreating Victorian cookery were the most amusing parts of the book. Apparently, mock turtle soup is made by boiling a whole calf's head. Kimball tried actual turtle as well, but they are a protected species now, so that complicated matters. There were more adventures with the calves' foot jellies for dessert. 
 
This is a must-read for foodies interested in the history of American cuisine, but it is also of interest to history buffs, in general. Kimball includes quite a bit of information on life in Boston in the late 19th century. 

Posted by Ultra Violet on 11/15/12
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Thanksgiving is next week, but that doesn't have to mean turkey. There are plenty of vegetarian and vegan options for filling up your gang. Check out this podcast of Violet from Digital Services extolling the virtues of our library's extensive special diet cookbook selection. Her personal favorite is New Vegetarian.
 
Whether it is meatless, gluten-free or dairy-free, we have the book for you. Don't let tradition rule your eating! Let the library help you take control of your holidays.

 
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6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
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