Posts tagged with "Adults"

Posted by paichele on 06/29/15
 
More than 200 Arlington Heights book lovers turned out after-hours on Saturday, June 27 for An Evening with Candace Bushnell. The sold-out event, presented and co-sponsored by the library and the Tuscan Market Book Group, featured the bestselling author of Sex and the City and Lipstick Jungle who is currently on a national book tour for her newest release, Killing Monica.  During her three-hour appearance in the Hendrickson Room, Candace signed books, took photographs with attendees and delivered a lively onstage presentation including an audience Q&A.
 
"I like writing about characters that are larger than life," Bushnell said. She revealed that her latest character in Killing Monica  comes from an idea of always having to put our best selves forward in today's social media-crazed world.
 
"Monica is always happy and smiling and when you see her, you want to be her. Nothing ever goes wrong for Monica so we definitely know she is an imaginary character," Bushnell joked. "The book really is about identity and who we are and how we reinvent ourselves."

The event began with Arlington Heights Mayor Tom Hayes welcoming Candace and proclaiming Saturday, June 27, 2015 as "Candace Bushnell Book Launch Event Day in the Village of Arlington Heights.”  In response Candace told the crowd:

“Libraries mean so much to me. When I was a kid, the library was where we went for our entertainment. There’s a universe out there at your library. I am so touched and so proud to be here.”

Posted by aharder on 11/20/18
 
 
As a young girl growing up Portland, Ore., Mary Hamilton fondly recalls Saturday mornings spent with her dad hitting garage sales, scouring for treasures, “It was always the thrill of the hunt…whatever came our way, whatever caught our eye.” 
 
Decades later, that same passion for ‘the hunt’ led the now Arlington Heights resident to the library’s Business Services department. Mary wanted to know – could she use her keen eye for collectible glassware to start her own online business? She scheduled an appointment and met one-on-one with a business specialist to help answer that question.
 
“That meeting 100 percent for sure was my motivation,” Hamilton said. “Having someone who knows the business world encouraging me made me feel like I was on the right path.”
 
The meeting resulted in a lot of practical advice, too, like establishing banking, obtaining a State of Illinois business license and structuring workflow. She also got tips on photography and marketing her products visually online.
 
“The best advice of all was that once you create your business, how important it is to stay focused and true to your brand,” she said. 
 
As Hamilton began building her online shop, she enrolled in the library’s Quickbooks for the Small Business Owner and Creating a Business Presence on Facebook classes and continued to educate herself about collectibles by checking out reference books from the library. 
 
The result of her efforts was Banbury Cross Vintage, an Etsy shop featuring vintage glassware and treasures. The online store has received visitors from around the world.  
 
“When you’re starting a business, it can be intimidating because you are putting yourself out there,” Hamilton said. “But everyone at the library has been really supportive, and with it being the library you know there is no ulterior motive. No one is trying to sell you anything. They really are just there for you and supporting the community.”
 

Posted by wtolan on 12/08/17
 
Thank you to all of our wonderful customers, staff and community groups who helped contribute to the Arlington Heights Memorial Library's Holiday Book Drive throughout the past few weeks. 770 books were generously donated for infants, children and teens for Wheeling Township's Adopt-a-Family program. Special thanks go to library staff and volunteers, the Board of Library Trustees members, the Lakeshore Circle Book Club, the Rolling Green Nine-Hole Golf League and Girl Scout Troop 40792. The library has donated 17,132 books to children and teens in need since it introduced the Holiday Book Drive in 1998. Thank you again for helping provide the gift of literacy in our community during the holidays.

Posted by aharder on 07/14/17

As of August 1, the AHML mobile app will be discontinued. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website, http://www.ahml.info.

We encourage our app users to bookmark our mobile menu screen at http://www.ahml.info/mobile.html. You will still be able to manage your account, search our catalog, place a hold and register for programs on your phone or tablet using our mobile-friendly website. The mobile site is accessible from any browser. By August 1, the library’s mobile website will have the added feature of allowing you to display your barcode on your mobile device. Navigate to My Account as of August 1, and you’ll see an option to display your library card’s barcode. You can then use this barcode at our self-checkout stations or at our Checkout Desk in the library. 

Feel free to contact the library for assistance.
 
If you would like to create an icon on your device's home screen so you still can access our website quickly, follow the instructions below:

For Android Devices:
Chrome
1. Open the Chrome app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and click Add
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

Firefox
1. Open the Firefox app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Select the Options button (located in the top right corner of the app)
4. Select "Page"
5. Select "Add to Home Screen"
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen

For iPhone and Apple Devices
1. Open the Safari app
2. Navigate to ahml.info
3. Tap the Share button at the bottom of the screen
4. Select "Add to Home Screen"
5. Name your bookmark and save it
6. You should now see a new icon on your phone's home screen
If you have any questions, please contact the library for assistance
 

Posted by aharder on 08/05/18
 
The Arlington Heights Memorial Library is a recipient of the 2018 John Cotton Dana Award, provided in conjunction with the H.W. Wilson Foundation, the American Library Association and EBSCO. This national award honors outstanding library public relations and marketing.

The library took creative inspiration from social media themes in its 2017 One Book, One Village (OBOV) community read selection, The Circle by Dave Eggers, and built #beinthecircle, a communications campaign combining traditional marketing with a heightened emphasis on social media. Key to the success of the program was using “influencer” marketing to promote the program. The communications and marketing team identified popular local social media users to create posts about the online book discussion and library exhibit to their followers. In return, they had an impressive statistical growth over the previous year’s OBOV campaign, which included 84 percent more social media engagement, 100% growth in author event attendance, 36% growth in the OBOV title circulation and a remarkable 55 percent growth in book discussion attendance.

“We are really excited about this award,” said Interim Executive Director Mike Driskell. “To be included in this national recognition is really an honor. Our communications and marketing team does an amazing job promoting the library on a daily basis. This One Book, One Village campaign is one of the finest examples of their work.”

 
The team behind the library’s #beinthecircle communications campaign includes Pat Aichele and April Harder (editorial), Brian Benson and Colleen Kelly (graphics) and Mary Hastings (manager).
 
A key component of the campaign was the first-time use of influencer marketing. Social media partners included Randy Recklaus (Village of Arlington Heights), Adam Harris (Arlington Heights School District 25), Randal Klaproth (Metropolis Performing Arts Centre), and local bloggers Melissa Schwartz and Alison Groen.
 
In recognition of this achievement, the eight John Cotton Dana Award winning libraries received a $10,000 check from the H.W. Wilson Foundation. The awards were presented at a reception hosted by EBSCO during the American Library Association annual conference in New Orleans on June 24, 2018.
 
At the annual conference, The American Library Assocations's PR Xchange awarded designers Brian Benson and Colleen Kelly four design awards for their orginal designs for pieces promoting Special Programs & Exhibits (One Book, One Village 2017), Materials Promoting Collections (Book Discussion Brochure), Newsletters (AHML Newsletter) and Reading Program Themes (Winter Reading Challenge 2017). 
 

Posted by paichele on 05/05/15
 
Excitement filled the library's Marketplace on Monday night, May 4, as more than 150 Arlington Heights students, parents and teachers got a first glimpse at the 2015 District 25 Art Show. An annual event for 23 years, this year's show features 200 works of art curated from seven area elementary schools and two middle schools. Pieces range from illustrations and mixed media to self portraits and 3D art. 
 
"Each project has a concept or historical element attached to it," explains Brenda Miller, an art teacher at Westgate Elementary School and the team leader of the District 25 art teachers. "The students selected for the show are the ones who best grasped the concepts and their pieces display originality, craftsmanship and creativity. It is remarkable and wonderful to see what the kids produce when they have a steady diet of art. "
 
The children's efforts and talents fill ten colorful panels in the Marketplace and two display cases near the Dunton Street entrance of the library. The District 25 Art Show runs through the end of May.

Posted by paichele on 04/13/15
 
Thanks to generosity of the Friends of the Library, programs in the Hendrickson Room are now much clearer for those with hearing aids and cochlear implants. An audio loop system has been installed that sends electromagnetic signals to a tiny receiver already in most hearing aids and cochlear implants. It allows people who use them to hear sounds directly from the AV system. This reduces or cuts out background noise making it much easier to hear. To use the system, attendees need only set their hearing aids to the T (telecoil) setting.
 
In addition to the audio loop system, the library offers a number of other assistive devices.

Posted by wtolan on 06/29/18
 
"What would happen if I took all those colors, turned them into a song and then turned it into a book" asked acclaimed children's book author and illustrator Chris Raschka as he used a color wheel and his book, Mysterious Thelonious, to introduce an audience of eager children to music as a form of storytelling.
 
The kids held onto the colorful pages of Raschka's book as it stretched across the Hendrickson Room floor while Raschka performed a song using his concertina, a musical instrument that bears a resemblance to an accordion. This was all part of an interactive storytime event that took place on Friday, June 29 at the library.
 
This storytime was just one of several programs that took place this week and gave residents a one-of-a-kind opportunity to meet and get creative with Raschka, who is the library's summer artist in residence.
 
Based in Brooklyn, Raschka is known for using watercolor, pastel and charcoal pencil to create artwork with bright colors, freeform shapes and a vivid sense of movement and rhythm. He has authored more than 60 children's books and has been selected for The New York Times' Ten Best Illustrated Books of the Year list multiple times. His most recent book, New Shoes, was published in May 2018.
 
During his artist-in-residency, Raschka put on a bookmaking workshop for kids on Wednesday, June 27 that gave children the chance to put together their own story. He created a pop-up art studio the following day in the library's Marketplace where kids were able to see him at work and feed off of his creativity and imagination. Raschka held an artist talk and book signing on Thursday, June 28 as well.
 
His interactive storytime on Friday then gave children a lot to do as he performed interactive read-alongs of his books Yo! Yes? and Charlie Parker Played Be Bop, held several plays that let the kids act as characters like Moosey Moose, Lamby Lamb and Crabby Crab and let the children dance to the music of jazz composer Sun Ra. He also held a second live art-demo in the library's Marketplace on Friday.
 
Raschka's week at the library will conclude with a bookmaking workshop for adults on Saturday, June 30. Bravo! Chris Raschka, Raschka's exhibit that showcases more than 50 works of art, will continue to be on display in the Marketplace through Sunday, August 12. This exhibition was organized by the National Center for Children's Illustrated Literature, Abilene, Texas.

Posted by paichele on 05/15/17
 
How do people flourish in the second half of life? That was the central question explored in an insightful presentation by New York Times bestselling author Barbara Bradley Hagerty, on Friday, May 12 at the library. More than a 100 people gathered in the Hendrickson Room to hear the award-winning journalist for NPR speak about the challenges and opportunities of midlife featured in her most recent book, Life Reimagined:The Science, Art and Opportunity of Midlife. Sharing extensive research on how people think, feel and react in their 40s, 50s and 60s, coupled with her own life experiences, Hagerty invited the audience to "take an inventory of your life" reminding them "midlife is not a dress rehearsal. You are halfway through your life."
 
Hagerty cited friendships and the ability to revise expectations as two key clues to flourishing in midlife and beyond. Following her 60-minute presentation, Hagerty engaged in a lively audience Q&A. Here is a snapshot of some of the ideas shared:
 
People who thrive in midlife take the good and the bad.
 
People who flourish let go of what they haven't achieved and focus instead on what they have achieved.
 
Friends allow us to offload our stress.
 
Call up an old friend. Make a new one.
 
Happy people develop what I call a little purpose....a little purpose brings joy and pushes you out of your comfort zone.
 
Take an inventory of your life. What are the relationships, what at the activities, what are the little purposes worth investing in.
 
Pick those things, relationships, purposeful activities and truly engage in them, don't let them go on autopilot. 
 
Making the Most of Midlife: The Conversation Continues
If you’re feeling inspired by the ideas in Life Reimagined, we welcome you to join in a community conversation. Discuss your own midlife experience and share ideas with others about how to get the most out of this exciting time. Reading the book ahead of time is not required, but is encouraged.

Date and time: Thursday, May 18, 7–8:30 p.m.
Location: Hendrickson Room
Register

Posted by wtolan on 11/11/18
 
"The greatest gift you can give yourself is yourself," said author Jason Reynolds to an audience of 120 students at Our Lady of the Wayside School, Thursday morning, November 8. Reynolds continued his conversation with students the next day at South Middle School and Thomas Middle School and by the end of his visit, he spoke to 1,870 Arlington Heights students.
 
Reynolds also spoke at Forest View Auditorium during his two-day visit to Arlington Heights, where he captivated an audience of more than 300 people who came to hear the award-winning, bestselling author speak. Reynolds is known for writing young adult novels including All American Boys, As Brave As You, the Track series, Miles Morales: Spider-Man, Long Way Down and For Every One.
 
Many of the people in attendance at Forest View were high school teachers and students who had recently read Jason Reynolds' Long Way Down in class.
 
"There was a sense of accomplishment for a lot of kids who've never read a book," said Anthony Como, an English teacher at Rolling Meadows High School while talking about the impact Reynolds' books have had on his students. "One of my students [told me]: 'This is the first book I've finished and now I enjoy reading.'"
 
During his appearances, Reynolds told stories about growing up in Washington D.C. that ranged from how he was inspired to write poetry after listening to Queen Latifah's 1993 rap album Black Reign to his struggles of getting into literature at an early age.
 
"I felt like these books weren't interested in reading me," Reynolds said as he talked about his struggle to relate to characters in books like Lord of the Flies and Of Mice and Men. He ended up reading his first book, Black Boy by Richard Wright, when he was 18 years old, which inspired him to go back and read the books he missed while in middle school and high school.
 
Following each of his presentations, Reynolds went on to answer questions during a Q&A session, and he emphasized how important it is for students to know that everyone's story matters.
 
"I want you to love my stories, but not as much as I want you to love your own," he said, a message that resonated with many including Arlington Heights residents Dana Trawczynski and her son, William.
 
"I think it's great how he said to be the best you, you can be," Trawczynski said. "It is a really strong message to give kids to be yourself. I don't think they hear that enough."
 
Jason Reynolds' visits to four area schools were made possible thanks to a partnership between the Arlington Heights Memorial Library and local schools.

 
If your status is Confirmed Registration, your spot for the event is confirmed.

If registration for this event is full, you will be placed on a waiting list. Wait listed registrants are moved to the confirmed registration list (in the order of registration) when cancelations are received. You will receive an email notification if you are moved from the wait list to the confirmed registration list.

6.012 Patron-Generated Content

04/27/2011
The Library offers various venues in which patrons can contribute content that is accessible to the public.  These include, but are not limited to, blogs, reviews, forums, and social tagging on the Library’s website and catalog.  Any instance in which a patron posts written or recorded content to any of the Library’s venues that are accessible to the public is considered “patron-generated content” and is subject to this policy.
 
By contributing patron-generated content, patrons grant the Library an irrevocable, royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual right and license to use, copy, modify, display, archive, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works based upon that content.
 
By submitting patron-generated content, patrons warrant they are the sole authors or that they have obtained all necessary permission associated with copyrights and trademarks to submit such content.
 
Patrons are liable for the opinions expressed and the accuracy of the information contained in the content they submit.  The Library assumes no responsibility for such content.
 
The Library reserves the right not to post submitted content or to remove patron-generated content for any reason, including but not limited to:
 
  • content that is profane, obscene, or pornographic;
 
  • content that is abusive, discriminatory or hateful on account of race, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, or sexual orientation;
 
  • content that contains threats, personal attacks, or harassment;
 
  • content that contains solicitations or advertisements;
 
  • content that is invasive of another person’s privacy;
 
  • content that is unrelated to the discussion or venue in which it is posted;
 
  • content that is in violation of the Library’s Code of Conduct or any other Library policy